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The Art of Sportscasting: How to Build a Successful Career

The Art of Sportscasting <em>How to Build a Successful Career</em> by Tom Hedrick The Art of Sportscasting: How to Build a Successful Career
Your Price: $24.95 CDN
Author: Tom Hedrick
Publisher: Diamond Communications
Format: Softcover
# of Pages: 304
Pub. Date: 2000
ISBN-10: 1888698241
ISBN-13: 9781888698244

About the Book:

This no-holds-barred, play-by-play manual on professional sportscasting gives you an inside course at the sportscaster's challenges and victories.

Author Tom Hedrick has elicited and gathered strategic and tactical advice from the top professionals in sporstcasting. Over 76 top-notch sports broadcasting personalities share their experience and acquired wisdom, including Vin Scully of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Jack Buck of the St. Louis Cardinals, Joe Buck of FOX Sports and Bob Carpenter of ESPN basketball, as well as Curt Gowdy, Ray Scott, Bob Costas, Jim Nantz, Keith Jackson, Bob Starr, Joe Castiglione, Kevin Harlan, and Mitch Holthus.

While their stories are enjoyable and motivating, these pros do more than reminisce. They itemize specific actions with lists of do's and don'ts and tips. Most importantly, they talk about the strong personal values and philosophies that are and have been essential to their success and to the journey for getting there.

About the Author:

Tom Hedrick has been the "Voice" of professional and college teams for over 40 years, including the Kansas City Chiefs (KCMO Radio), Cincinnati Reds, Texas Rangers, Dallas Cowboys, University of Kansas Jayhawks, and Nebraska Cornhuskers. For CBS Radio, Tom called three Super Bowls and nine Cotton Bowls.

He has also been a Professor for over 35 years at the William Allen White School of Journalism at the University of Kansas. He has earned state and National Sportscaster of the Year awards seven times, and had been inducted into the Kansas Broadcasting Hall of Fame in Topeka.